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SherlockLive Brings The Mystery to Fans on Twitter

SherlockLive Brings The Mystery to Fans on Twitter

Sherlock fans got a chance to join the detective in solving a crime online recently when the BBC’s Twitter page was “taken over” for the better part of an hour. From 8 to 9 pm (London time) on January 10th, a mystery unfolded on the BBC Twitter page led by someone claiming to be Sherlock Holmes.

Tweets had been going out from the BBC for the last couple days leading up to the 10th announcing that there would be an interactive event taking place in which readers could help solve a mystery. It bore the hashtag #sherlocklive, and promised to be a #puredrama. BBC later sent out a tweet claiming that someone claiming to be Sherlock Holmes was trying to take over their Twitter account, and they would not let this happen.

Over the next couple days, the drama unfolded, with the BBC claiming that it would stop the infiltrator, and Sherlock Holmes cutting in to tell everyone to watch for his appearance at 8 pm on Tuesday. When the magic time arrived, the character of Sherlock tweeted out from the BBC account saying that he was “bored and angry and need a distraction.”

He then explained that this was a chance for followers to test their powers of deduction against his. “Can you work out who killed Daniel Collard?” he tweeted.  “Probably not, but you might as well try.” The next tweet, which came soon after, was the introduction to a murder mystery. He provided photographs that included the initial report of the murder, and pictures of the deceased, clues, and other suspects. Every few minutes after that, a new tweet came through providing more information and more clues that further described the case.

Clues ranged from interviews with witnesses performed by Lastrade to photos and video of the crime scene to profiles of the victim and the suspects. These were interrupted by occasional polls questioning the audience as to what they thought the answers to various puzzles might be. These were again answered with Sherlock’s usual condescending quips, such as, “I’ve narrowed down the suspects for you otherwise we’ll be here all year,” and, “It seems all murders would remain unsolved if it was left up to you lot.”

After close to an hour of providing clues and information, Sherlock tweeted, “Bored of reading your nonsense now. Tweet a video or pic of you telling me who the killer was.”  More than a thousand people sent in their guesses. Five minutes later, he tweeted a video of the answer, showing highlights of the important evidence with titles explaining what happened. It was well produced and looked like the ending of one of their episodes.

To end it, he wrote, “Well done to those who got it right… in the end. Delete your accounts those who didn’t. I’m going.  You’re boring me now.” Two minutes later, BBC resumed their regular tweets, claiming they had regained control from the “hacker.”

Did you take part in the #SherlockLive mystery? Tell us about your experience in the comments below!

Images by: BBC 1

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