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Get in the Holiday Spirit by Supporting Shut Up & Sit Down, One of the Best Game Reviewers Around

Get in the Holiday Spirit by Supporting Shut Up & Sit Down, One of the Best Game Reviewers Around

If you grew up as a kid consuming quality edu-tainment like I did,  Shut Up & Sit Down makes games reviews you would love. For five years, Paul, Matt, Quinns and Pip have been providing quality game reviews online. They don’t sell advertising and don’t take a cent from game publishers. They create insightful and entertaining video, blog, and podcast game reviews. But now they’re looking for people to help them continue to do so.

As a former Geek & Sundry vlogger, I can reveal a secret about video that not a lot of people know: the easier something looks in a video you’re watching, the harder it is to do. Multiple takes, a pile of editing, calculated staging, and all that other stuff that happens and is invisible in the final product. For Shut Up & Sit Down, a 20 minute review can take about 40 hours of work to create.

And because it takes so much work, it’s really hard to do without some sort of income. Not only does Shut Up & Sit Down create fantastic content, but Paul, Quinns, Matt, and Pip bring over 50 collective years of professional reviewing and writing experience to metaphorical table. As Quinns said in an interview with G&S, “I think we’re the only team that approaches board games with the hard knocks associated with writing articles for The Guardian, Wired, The BBC and so on. We were paid to write about not just games, but comedy, tech and art in a way that was insightful and engaging, and those are the skills we’re trying to bring to a new field. In other words, we’re old, we’re getting older, and part of fundraising is so that we can support ourselves and our families when we should probably be doing a job that is in any way sensible.”

It’s not as though publishers don’t offer money for advertising or reviews on Shut Up & Sit Down. The crew could easily do that, but it’s not something they want to do for themselves or their audience. “Adverts make life worse for our viewers,” Quinns says. “Not taking money from publishers in return for a review or preview of their game is an even simpler choice. By saying no to that stuff our readers and our staff get to enjoy the best stuff the board game world has to offer and everyone’s happier.”

They also need a budget for silly props, because come on, this dramatic recreation of gameplay in their recent Conan review is hilarious:

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Furthermore, by supporting Shut Up & Sit Down, you’re also helping them spread the notion of inclusivity, which they’ve been remarking upon openly and candidly in their content. Its importance is something Quinns ties to his personal integrity: “For me, it’s that games are my life. They’re my job, they’re how I relax, and I never feel more that I’m doing what I was put on this earth to do than when I’m enjoying a new video game or board game and pulling at all those lovely new systems. But a consequence of my entire identity being tangled up in games is that I don’t want them to be embarrassing.” He remarks on how he stopped calling himself a gamer around the time bomb threats were being made in response to panels and talks advocating inclusivity, particularly those of Anita Sarkeesian. “Something I hear a lot is that SU&SD keeps talking about inclusivity so that we get more donations, but the truth is even more selfish than that. I just don’t want to be ashamed of games.”

Like the edu-tainment you used to consume as a child, where people would support PBS with a donation and in exchange they’d give you a totebag with tapes or CDs of your favourite counting songs or rocking Lawrence Welk tunes, Shut Up & Sit Down is also offering people who support them a (virtual) totebag of goodies in their monthly newsletter, which serves as a source of insider information about what the guys are up to, what they’re reading, or what else they might be excited about. It is also a way for the team to connect and listen to their donating audience. As Quinn explained, “the coolest thing about the Newsletter is that, since we think of the people who donate are the ‘bosses’ of SU&SD, if we ever have a question about the future of the site we can just email the people who donate and sift a democratic response out of all the replies.”

If you’re unable to help them with ongoing or one-time donations, you can help them by supporting them in other ways too. Beyond supporting the site by buying merch from their store, Quinns says that shopping at FLGSs that support them or by telling people about Shut Up & Sit Down is also a huge help. Quinns even gives fashion advice if you want to do it while rocking the SU&SD style: “Tweet, do a Facebook post, draw a pear on your belly and start wearing a crop top, whatever you can to get the word out.”

Do you support online content creators? Let us know if you do (and who) in comments below!

Featured & Blog Image Credits: Shut Up & Sit Down (Gif animation by Teri Litorco)


Teri Litorco’s torso is too short for crop tops, but she loves supporting online content creators in making awesome stuff. She also makes awesome stuff herself, like her book, The Civilized Guide to Tabletop Gaming. You can follow her gaming and fashion adventures (more gaming and cats, less fashion, mind you) on social media: Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and YouTube.

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